Plants

More Stories in Plants

  1. 050719_CG_extinction_feat.jpg
    Ecosystems

    A million species could vanish, and people are to blame

    Human activities are putting a million plant and animal species at risk of extinction, a new study finds. But it’s not too late to save many of them, scientists add.

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  2. Environment

    City living makes trees grow fast but die young

    Many cities plant trees to absorb carbon dioxide. But city trees grow fast and die young, which means they absorb less carbon dioxide than forest trees do.

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  3. Plants

    Need a little luck? Here’s how to grow your own

    A 2019 Intel ISEF finalist used a plant hormone and extra fertilizer to boost the numbers of multi-leafed clovers — including lucky four-leafed plants — she could reliably grow.

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  4. Ecosystems

    Warming pushes lobsters and other species to seek cooler homes

    Plants and animals are moving toward the poles, changing timing of important events and more — all in response to climate change.

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  5. Environment

    Life on Earth is mostly green

    A new survey of life on Earth finds that plants and microbes dominate. But even though humans are in the minority, they still play a major role.

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  6. Plants

    This houseplant can clean indoor air

    Houseplants may be able to help clean up polluted indoor air. Scientists gave this one a boost by givng it a gene from a rabbit.

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  7. Plants

    Rare-plant hunters race against time to save at-risk species

    One in five plants is at risk of extinction. Meet the rare plant hunters who rappel down cliffs and trek through forests to save them.

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  8. Plants

    Scientists Say: Nectar

    Nectar is a fluid filled with sugar that plants — especially flowers — produce. They use it to attract animals that will then spread their pollen to another plant.

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  9. Plants

    Plants don’t grow well when always on high alert

    Plants make bitter-tasting chemicals to defend themselves against hungry bugs. But they pay a cost for always being on alert, scientists find.

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